Future of Abortion in Question in Michigan, Dividing State Senate Candidates

Enforcement of a 1931 law that mandates jail sentences for women who have abortions and doctors who provide them has been blocked by a circuit court judge—for now.

Future of Abortion in Question in Michigan, Dividing State Senate Candidates

By Main Street Sentinel Staff

In the aftermath of the repeal of Roe v. Wade in June, abortion in Michigan faces an uncertain future.

For now, the 1931 law, which could be used to seek jail sentences for doctors who provide abortions and women who seek them out, making no exceptions for cases of rape or incest, cannot be enforced. Gov. Gretchen Whitmer filed a lawsuit to block the law, and Circuit Court Judge Jacob J. Cunningham has issued an injunction, saying that immediate enforcement would bring “extreme costs” and “send the health-care system into crisis.”

The “ultimate fate of abortion access” in Michigan may be decided by voters in November. State Rep. Padma Kuppa, a Democrat running for Senate District 9, has said that “privacy in medical decisions…is central to a person’s civil and economic liberties.” Her Republican opponent Michael Webber has earned the endorsement of Right to Life of Michigan, an anti-abortion organization that is seeking to enforce the 1931 law that criminalizes abortion.

Kuppa is a mechanical engineer and project manager serving a second term representing Michigan’s 41’s House District. Webber is a licensed insurance agent who has lived in the district for over 30 years.